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Practice a Free Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal (WGCTA) & Critical Thinking Sample Questions – 2021

Job Assessment

Saturated is one of the many words used to describe the current job market. While a greater pool of eligible candidates may sound like a blessing for employers, it has also made the employment process a lot more tedious. Companies have turned to institutions like Pearson Assessments Limited to assist in keeping the process objective by providing additional ways to fairly assess potential employees. The Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal Test has become one of the most popular pre-employment aptitude tests currently used during the hiring process.

 

What Is the Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal Test?

Critical thinking refers to a person’s ability to observe a scenario and have a clear understanding of that scenario from multiple points of view. The person should be able to separate the facts of the scenario from personal opinions and assumptions. Critical thinking has become an essential skill required by most job roles today. Employers want to know that employees will be able to make logical decisions, only taking into account the facts, without being distracted by his/her own emotions or the emotions of others.

To assess the critical thinking skills of prospective employees organizations have turned to Pearson Assessments, administrators of The Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal Test. The Watson Glaser Test, authored by Goodwin Watson and Edwin Glaser, is a psychometric assessment used as a part of the pre-employment screening process and internal audits at just about all career levels, including and not limited to recent graduates, managers, and high-level executives. Universities in recent times have also utilized the test to assess prospective postgraduate students. The test has been in use in the United States since the 1960s.

The Watson Glaser test was designed using the RED critical thinking model, which was also developed by Pearson. The RED model is based in three key areas that are necessary to be able to think critically.

  • Recognize assumptions – This aspect of critical thinking is about understanding information and considering if it is true based on evidence, rather than take it at face value. This ability keeps an individual from leaping to conclusions on little to no evidence and helps them to recognize when information is missing.
  • Evaluate arguments – This is all about being able to sift through information, and being able to decide which arguments are factual and evidence-based. An individual needs to have the ability to remain objective and use logic.
  • Draw conclusions – This is the ability to use all the information you have been presented with and come to a conclusion. This also necessitates being able to adjust your view in the light of new information.

 

Types of Questions:

The Watson-Glaser Test has five sections, each of which tests different abilities. The five sections are used to measure the skills needed to be successful in the three key areas presented in the RED critical thinking model.

The sections are outlined below:

  1. Inference – In this section, the candidate is presented with a series of facts. Below these facts is an inferred statement, which the candidate needs to assess. The candidate needs to decide whether the statement is true based on the facts outlined in the previous statement.
  2. Recognizing Assumptions – The candidate is presented with a statement of facts followed by an assumption. The candidate should then determine if the assumption made is correct based on the facts presented.
  3. Deduction – The candidate is presented with a statement of facts, which is followed by a concluding statement. The candidate is expected to determine whether or not the concluding statement follows the statement of facts.
  4. Interpretation –The candidate is presented with a paragraph, which is followed by a concluding statement. The candidate is expected to determine whether or not the conclusive statement follows the paragraph without a shadow of a doubt. The answer is either it follows, or it does not follow.
  5. Evaluation of Arguments – The candidate is presented with a question which is followed by an argument. It is the candidate’s responsibility to determine how strong the argument is.

The exam adheres to the RED model of evaluating critical thinking (Recognizing assumptions, Evaluating arguments, and Drawing conclusions).  Candidates are therefore assessed based on three key areas, comprehension, analysis, and evaluation.

Employers generally administer the test remotely and often unsupervised, or they may arrange with nearby assessment centers to assist with the process. There are two variations of the exam, an older variant, which consists of 80 questions with a time limit of 60 minutes. The second variation is shorter; the exam has 40 questions with a time limit of 30 minutes. The test is available in English (British and American), French, Dutch, and Spanish making it widely available and widely accepted.

 

Who Takes the Watson Glaser Critical Appraisal Test?

The test is internationally available and is used by a large number of corporations and educational institutions to assess prospective employees and students. Below is a list of a few organizations, which currently rely on the Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Test:

Ernst & Young Deloitte Simmons & Simmons IBM Linklaters
PepsiCo Macy’s Payless ShoeSource Bloomingdale’s Microsoft
Vodafone Hogan Lovells Allstate Clifford Chance

  

How to Pass the Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal Test?

Pearson Assessments Limited believes there is no way to really prepare for the Watson Glaser Test. It is genuinely believed, however, that exposure to the exam material as well as critical thinking concepts will help with any pre-exam anxiety.

Getting a study guide might be a wise idea and they can be found with a simple Google search. Their contents range from general exam tips as well as practice questions and answers. These will help to give you an idea of the nature of the exam. Speaking to persons who have previously sat for the exam is also strongly recommended. These persons might be able to help with the practice questions, point you in the direction of additional resources they may have used to prepare as well as provide some insight about handling your usual pre-exam jitters.

 

Conclusion

Whether you are seeking a job or looking to move up the employment ladder, there is a strong possibility that you will have to sit for an aptitude test. That being said, it is encouraged that you ensure you are on the winning side of things when the exam is done and dusted. Outline a solid preparation plan and stick to it. You may be next in line for that dream job of yours.

All the best with the job hunt!

Critical Thinking Sample Questions:

For each scenario two different statements are given. Choose the option that relates the statement to the scenario.

 

Arguments:

Should parents limit the time their child spends watching television at night?

  1. Yes; Children who stay up watching TV do not get enough sleep and sleep is vital for a child to grow and learn.
    • Strong Argument
    • Weak Argument
  2. Yes; Children should be spending time with their family at night.
    • Strong Argument
    • Weak Argument

 

Assumptions:

In 2014, New York State had the 4th lowest ranking of death by firearm in all 50 states.

  1. Three other states had fewer deaths by guns than NY in 2014.
    • Assumption Made
    • Assumption Not Made
  2. In 2014, NY had fewer gun owners than 46 other states.
    • Assumption Made
    • Assumption Not Made

 

Inferences:

In February 2018 grocery stores sold more canned vegetables than fresh vegetables. Their profits, however, were higher for fresh vegetables.

  1. The profit margin for fresh vegetables is greater than that of canned vegetables.
    • True
    • Probably True
    • More Information Required
    • Probably False
    • False
  2. Grocery stores charged more for fresh vegetables than canned vegetables.
    • True
    • Probably True
    • More Information Required
    • Probably False
    • False

 

 Deductions:

Ever since the legalization of marijuana in Washington state in 2012, the cannabis related felony convictions have gone down.

  1. Washington state had more marijuana related convictions in 2011 than in 2013.
    • Conclusion Follows
    • Conclusion Does Not Follow
  2. There has been less smoking of marijuana after 2012 in Washington state than before.
    • Conclusion Follows
    • Conclusion Does Not Follow

 

 

 

Answers

Arguments:

  1. Strong Argument. The argument made gives a clear disadvantage to the statement and directly relates to it making it a strong argument.
  2. Weak Argument. Watching TV does not necessarily preclude one from spending time with their family. The argument is not directly related to the initial statement and is therefore a weak argument.

 

Assumptions:

  1. Assumption Made. If NY was rated 4th lowest than clearly three other states were ranked lower.
  2. Answer: Assumption Not Made. The statement does not address gun owners.

Inferences:

  1. If more money was made on fresh vegetables, then the profit margins must be greater.
  2. Probably True. If the profit margins were greater for fresh vegetables then we know either the fresh vegetables were bought by the grocery store from their supplier for less, were sold to the customers for more, or a combination of the two. In two of these scenarios the fresh vegetables were sold for more money than the canned vegetables making the statement most likely true. The third scenario, buying the fresh vegetables for less, is of course a possibility too and therefore the answer cannot be certain.

Deductions:

  1. Conclusion Follows. The statement clearly states that marijuana was legalized in 2012 and this caused convictions to go down. This means any time before 2012 there were more convictions than any time after 2012.
  2. Conclusion Does Not Follow. The statement does not discuss the usage of marijuana.